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A Multiyear Plan

Posted on October 14 2016

Renowned sports scientist A. S. Medvedyev wrote a text called A System of Multi-Year Training in Weightlifting (1986). It was translated by Andrew Charniga, Jr. It presents a system to train for and compete in the Olympics. Of course there is much information about training of all respects and how to achieve results at the correct time in a long-term plan. Someone once said, “When you fail to plan, you plan to fail.”

Another highly esteemed sports scientist, Tudor Bompa, wrote several books on all subject matter including long-term periodization. In Bompa’s book entitled Theory and Methodology of Training (1997), he discusses training of many lengths of time. The Greek Philostratus, an ancient scholar, proposed a four-day system, referred to as the Teter system. Men such as Tudor Bompa, A. S. Medvedyev, and the late Y. V. Verkoshansky and others such as the Bulgarians Felix Meerson and Hiden had much to do with the short- and long-term planning of the Bulgarian weight training system (Enver Turkileri, 1997).

Long-term planning must also address not only adaption but also restoration and how to avoid accommodation. If you read the book Adaption in Sports Training, a weekly plan turns into a monthly and then a yearly plan and of course a multiple-year plan.

By 1983, I had been participating in powerlifting for 27 years, but I had no formal plan; my plans or dreams turned into mostly nightmares. I realized that the key to success was part physics, part biomechanics, and very importantly mathematics. Here, I present a long-term plan that has passed the test of time. Dave “Neutron” Hoff has used this plan since he was 14 years old with a 400-pound squat. At 19 years old he had a 1005-pound squat. Now at 22 years old, he has a 1075-pound squat and a total of 2750 pounds at 260 bodyweight.

All of my methodologies came from the former Soviet Union system and their highly respected sports scientists and coaches. The strongest lifters lift the heaviest weight most often. I don’t mean lifting 20 pounds heavier than their training partners on max effort day, but on the dynamic day. Many people with a small grasp of training can’t understand this. But this is simply math, as outlined below.

For speed strength the combination is 50-60% barbell weight, plus 25% band tension at the top. I based this on 1000-pound squatters; we have 16 in all. A 1000-pound squatter would use 500, 550, and 600 in a three-week wave with 250 pounds of band tension at the top and 100 pounds at the bottom due to band shrinkage. So 500 pounds of bar weight is 600 pounds in the bottom and 750 pounds at the top. The second week 550 pounds of bar weight is 650 pounds in the bottom and 800 pounds at the top, and the third week wave is 600 pounds of bar weight, which is 750 pounds in the bottom and 850 pounds at the top. This is truly accommodation. But the most important point I will be making is for every 50-pound increase, a jump in volume of 600 pounds must be made. Of course on max effort day you must max out at the current strength you are at, plus have good form and train your weaknesses. But let’s look at the mathematical program that will guide you.

The Plan: From a 400 to a 1000-Pound Squat

400-Pound Max Squat

percentage weight (pounds) reps lifts band tension volume
50% 200 12×2 24 25% 4800
55% 220 12×2 24 25% 5280
60% 240 10×2 20 25% 480
Bar Speed is 0.8 m/s avg

 
450-Pound Max Squat

percent weight (pounds) reps lifts band tension volume
50% 225 12×2 24 25% 5400
55% 250 12×2 24 25% 6000
60% 270 10×2 20 25% 5400
Bar Speed is 0.8 m/s avg

 
500-Pound Max Squat

percent weight (pounds) reps lifts band tension volume
50% 250 12×2 24 25% 6000
55% 275 12×2 24 25% 6600
60% 300 10×2 20 25% 6000
Bar Speed is 0.8 m/s avg

 
550-Pound Max Squat

percent Weight (pounds) reps lifts band tension volume
50% 275 12×2 24 25% 6600
55% 300 12×2 24 25% 7200
60% 330 10×2 20 25% 6
Bar Speed is 0.8 m/s avg

 
600-Pound Max Squat

percent weight (pounds) reps lifts band tension volume
50% 300 12×2 24 25% 7200
55% 330 12×2 24 25% 7920
60% 360 10×2 20 25% 7200
Bar Speed is 0.8 m/s avg

650-Pound Max Squat

percent weight (pounds) reps lifts band tension volume
50% 325 12×2 24 25% 7800
55% 355 12×2 24 25% 8520
60% 390 10×2 20 25% 7800
Bar Speed is 0.8 m/s avg

 
700-Pound Max Squat

percent weight (pounds) reps lifts band tension volume
50% 350 12×2 24 25% 8400
55% 385 12×2 24 25% 9240
60% 420 10×2 20 25% 8400
Bar Speed is 0.8 m/s avg

750-Pound Max Squat

percent weight (pounds) reps lifts band tension volume
50% 375 12×2 24 25% 9000
55% 425 12×2 24 25% 10,200
60% 450 10×2 20 25% 9000
Bar Speed is 0.8 m/s avg

800-Pound Max Squat

percent weight (pounds) reps lifts band tension volume
50% 400 12×2 24 25% 9600
55% 440 12×2 24 25% 10,560
60% 480 10×2 20 25% 9600
Bar Speed is 0.8 m/s avg

850-Pound Max Squat

percent weight (pounds) reps lifts band tension volume
50% 425 12×2 24 25% 10,200
55% 470 12×2 24 25% 11,280
60% 510 10×2 20 25% 10,200
Bar Speed is 0.8 m/s avg

900-Pound Max Squat

percent weight (pounds) reps lifts band tension volume
50% 450 12×2 24 25% 10,800
55% 495 12×2 24 25% 11,880
60% 540 10×2 20 25% 10,800
Bar Speed is 0.8 m/s avg

950-Pound Max Squat

percent weight (pounds) reps lifts band tension volume
50% 475 12×2 24 25% 11,400
55% 520 12×2 24 25% 12,480
60% 570 10×2 20 25% 11,400
Bar Speed is 0.8 m/s avg

1000-Pound Max Squat

percent weight (pounds) reps lifts band tension volume
50% 500 12×2 24 25% 12,000
55% 550 12×2 24 25% 13,200
60% 600 10×2 20 25% 12,00
Bar Speed is 0.8 m/s avg

Math plays a major role in increasing strength. If you can do the wave at your current max with the correct bar speed for speed strength development (about 0.8 m/s), you will create a new squat record on meet day. You must also raise max effort records all year long and work on your lagging muscle groups to complement the speed work, done 72 hours before.

I will now give you some parameters of how to establish a contest max on a box squat with no knee wraps or suit straps up. Jean Fry, a 123-pound female, made a box squat with 280 pounds plus 140 pounds of band tension at the top, which equals 420 pounds. She did a strong 415-pound squat at a meet. As you can see, the top value is a strong indicator of how much you can squat at meet time. On the high end 500 pounds of bar weight and 375 pounds of band tension will translate to a squat of at least 800 pounds. Tony Ramos made 470 pounds of bar weight plus 375 pounds of band tension on a box squat and squatted 810 pounds at the Cincinnati Pro-Am at 181 pounds bodyweight. A bar weight of 550 pounds plus 375 pounds of band tension will translate to an 850-pound squat. A bar weight of 600 pounds plus 375 pounds of band tension will, and has many times, produce a 900-pound squat. A bar weight of 650 pounds plus 375 pounds of band tension will produce a 950-pound squat. A bar weight of 600 pounds plus 440 pounds of band tension will equate to a 1000-pound squat. A bar weight of 650 pounds plus 440 pounds of band tension will produce a squat of 1050 pounds.

Tony Bolognone squatted the following:

1000 pounds with 600 pounds bar weight and 440 pounds band tension

1050 pounds with 650 pounds bar weight and 440 pounds band tension

1100 pounds with 700 pounds bar weight and 440 pounds band tension

1130 pounds with 720 pounds bar weight and 440 pounds band tension

I can show many such studies like this. After all, we have 16 men who squat at least 1000 pounds officially, plus 17 men who deadlift 800 pounds. Remember, the volume must match your max strength, your form must be flawless, and you must raise your max effort exercises and fortify your weaknesses. When using a variety of bars to squat with, you must calculate the different maxes from a contest max. Try a Safety Squat bar max, a 14-inch cambered bar max, a front squat max, and so forth. By using different bars you will avoid the volume accommodation effect. Tudor Bompa told me I was doing flat loading, but after explaining the rotation of bars and special exercises, I showed how to avoid all manners of the law of accommodation. All progress in the classical lifts, meaning the snatch, clean-jerk, squat, bench, and deadlift, depends on controlling volume and the intensity zones laid out by many European sports scientists. I found this to be the most important factor in making continuous gains and preventing injuries. It is very important to maintain proper bar speed while doing all sets. Just look at the equation F = mA (force equals mass times acceleration), or look at the definition of power. Power is defined as work done divided by the time used to do the work, or P = W/t. The more powerful one is, the faster he or she can do the work. Next, match the work by your physical capabilities by controlling volume on speed development day with moderate intensity zones. On max effort day, 72 hours later, use a lower volume, 50% on average, with maximal intensity, hopefully more than 100%. Lastly, it is also important to perfect your form. This method will prolong your lifting career and make it possible to lift your most.

Louie Simmons

References
Bompa, Tudor. Theory and Methodology of Training. 1999.
Medvedyev, A. S. A System of Multi-Year Training in Weightlifting. 1986. Translated by
Andrew Charniga, Jr.
Enver Turkileri, Yazen. Naim Suleymanoglu, The Pocket Hercules. 1997
Simmons, Louie. The Westside Barbell Book of Methods. 2007
Viru, Atko. Adaption in Sports Training. 1995.

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